- - Thursday, April 26, 2018

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

This week, Vladimir Uglev was run over by a car in Russia. Most likely you have never heard of Vlad. However, the attempt on his life is significant.

The hit-and-run happened as he was walking across the street near his home on the Black Sea in Russia. The car is reported to have veered toward him at high speed. Unable to get out of the way, he jumped on top of the car and smashed the windshield with his head. He is still in the hospital.

In ordinary times, this incident would be just another attempt to take the life of someone far, far away, an incident that does not affect Americans. However, this time it is different. You see Vlad was a former Soviet scientist who was involved in the development of the famous Novichok nerve agent that was used against Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, in Salisbury, England. Mr. Skripal is a former member of the GRU and a double agent. He was exchanged in a spy swap a decade ago. More than 20 English citizens were hospitalized during the attack.

Vlad had the bad judgment to recently give an interview to the BBC, where he stated that the nerve agent used against Mr. Skripal was one he was involved in creating, dubbed “The Rookie,” reported Tsarizm.com. One wonders if Vlad’s time on this Earth is limited, no matter how successful his current medical treatment.

In addition to the situation with Vlad, the Russian military finally gave access to the site near Damascus in Syria where an alleged chemical attack recently took place against rebel populations. This access was granted weeks after the incident, which reportedly killed scores of civilians. France, Britain and the United States launched 105 cruise missiles against Syrian chemical weapons facilities after the attack, stating the barbarous action was an affront to humanity and that the use of weapons of mass destruction had to be confronted and deterred.

Why am I describing these incidents, you may ask? Because they raise several questions, chief among them:

Why would Vladimir be targeted if the Novichok did not come from Russia? It doesn’t make sense.

Why would the Russians withhold access from inspectors to the chemical weapons deployment site if they had no reason to fear that their ally, Syria’s Bashar Assad, gassed civilians?

I don’t know or have any proof that Russia was involved. However, I do know Russia invaded and seized the Crimean Peninsula. I do know the separatists in East Ukraine are supported by the Russian military, despite Kremlin denials. I do know that another Russian double agent was killed by radiation poisoning a decade ago in London. I do know that pro-Russian separatists shot down a civilian airliner over East Ukraine with a missile system provided by the Russian military. There is a pattern here of denial.

I also know that it is better to be feared than loved. Thank God Donald Trump understands this. Everyone knows the Trump-Russia collusion narrative was false. Even special counsel Robert Mueller, the Obama media and the Democrats know this. This is why they have shifted the investigation to Mr. Trump’s sex life.

The Donald is following in Ronald Reagan’s footsteps. Peace through strength works. It is the only thing will prevent a war. As we saw during the Obama years, saying “I can be more flexible after the election” or “Peace with honor” will only bring more conflict and death.

We don’t need to learn these lessons over again. Too many people died in the 20th century due to aggressions and evil ideologies, and their deaths should not be in vain.

No, I don’t have proof Russia was behind these attacks. What I do know is that we cannot take the chance that they were. We must rearm and rebuild the U.S. military and the NATO alliance.

It is the only way to ensure peace in the future for our children.

L. Todd Wood is a former special operations helicopter pilot and Wall Street debt trader who writes for The Washington Times. He also has contributed to Fox Business, The Moscow Times, National Review, the New York Post and many other publications. He can be reached through his website, LToddWood.com.

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